2. I also read a lot about SEO, CRO, and marketing in general, so I do my best to be a triple, or even a quadruple threat. Very recently I’ve done a 30-minute CRO consult with a client that *tripled* her checkout conversion (like, actually increased sales 3x), taking her from 5 figures per month to six figures per month in revenue. It definitely pays off to know how to do things that are related to copywriting. :)
I personally prefer things simple, so I think of content marketing technology solutions in terms of "need it" or "nice to have." Nice-to-have technologies are things like competitive intelligence tools, market research tools, or software that clues you in to real-time trends. Experiment with these on a rolling basis -- most will offer a free trial so you can validate it. But first, make sure you're set up with the core technologies every content marketing team needs.
I won't pull any punches: I started, and it took a while to stop. That is to say you're about to dive into a pretty in-depth post (that's a nice way of saying "long") about content marketing, one which you may want to bookmark to read later. But I think it covers most of the aspects of content marketing that modern inbound marketers need to consider, beyond the basics of simply writing content optimized for the web.
2. I also read a lot about SEO, CRO, and marketing in general, so I do my best to be a triple, or even a quadruple threat. Very recently I’ve done a 30-minute CRO consult with a client that *tripled* her checkout conversion (like, actually increased sales 3x), taking her from 5 figures per month to six figures per month in revenue. It definitely pays off to know how to do things that are related to copywriting. :)
I have just started a business writing resumés and job applications and doing interview coaching. I got my first client through a friend at work who is also my hairdresser. I helped her with some job applications and she recommended me to a customer (cut, foils, blow dry!) who paid me $200 to write responses to selection criteria for a government job. It took me ages to do this but I learned a lot and it gave me the confidence to keep going.
I’ve known for years that I wanted to try to make a living out of writing. I even have a Journalism degree. Im an avid reader, so I always study other writers’ style. I quickly noticed how many errors were being published, and how difficult writing is to many people, but how easy it is for me. I personally feel, when reading such material,that I’m a much better writer.

Businesses focused on expanding their reach to more customers will want to pay attention to the increase in the volume of visitors, as well as the quality of those interactions. Traditional measures of volume include the number of visitors to a page and number of emails collected, while time spent on page and click-through to other pages/ photos are good indicators for engagement.
Basically, the only exercise I DON’T do is #5. Mostly because I have plenty of copy to write as is. I know there’s value in copying stuff by hand, but I’ve just never felt it was necessary for me personally. However, if I remember correctly, that’s how Dan Kennedy built up his mad copywriting chops – just rewriting hundreds of sales letters by hand.

Great post! In case it hasn’t been pointed out though, AdWords headlines are limited to 25 characters, so your example rewrites wouldn’t fit. This is a really great exercise to do with a character counting tool – fitting everything into so few characters is a real challenge, especially when you sometimes have to include specific keywords that are super long. An added level of complexity are the two 35 character long description lines. If the first line ends in a “.” or “?”, it can be added to the end of the title after a dash (provided the ad isn’t on the sidebar where horizontal space is limited). The second line on the other hand can be dropped entirely on mobile, so anything crucial has to be headline or description 1. A real copy puzzle!
To have the best chance of being read, your letter should be open and airy-looking with short paragraphs--including some that are one sentence or even one word long. (A one-word paragraph? Here's how: Write something like "I have one word for suppliers who say they can't offer you a one-year guarantee." Follow that with a one-word paragraph such as "Baloney!" or any similar word you want to use. It is a real attention-getter.
Step 4: Produce and optimize your content. If you’re starting with original, high-quality content that you’ve invested real time and money to create, you’ll want to get the most out of every asset. You’ll also want to be sure your content stays fresh—out-of-date, no longer relevant content hurts your brand’s credibility. To make sure you’re getting the most out of your content marketing, remember the three Rs: 

Content marketing requires manpower, so the first step is figuring out who is going to head up the program. There's no one-size-fits-all for team structure -- it depends largely on the size of your company, your marketing team, and your budget. But if we assume that those three things are interlinked, as they often are, I can provide you with some frameworks based off of other content marketing-focused companies' structures. These should help you hire the right people, and have them "sitting" in the right spot in your organization.
If you want to write an exceptional sales letters format, you should first think about your audience. Come up with a list of all your potential leads and who they are so you can learn more about your potential customers. Without knowing your audience, you won’t know how you will sell your product. But once you understand your audience, writing the letter becomes an easier task.
Acknowledge payment of an overdue balance Acknowledge the Return of an Item For Exchange, Refund or Credit Announce a business anniversary Announce a change in policy or fee amount Announce a change of business address Announce a new business location Announce a new business, store, or branch office Announce a new product or service Announce a price decrease Announce a price increase Answer a request for information on a product or service Apologize for an invoice or billing error Ask for an investment Change an order Complain about a delay in an order Confirm an order you have made Confirm receipt of an order from a customer Confirm the receipt of a package or other item(s) Confirm the sending of a package or other item(s) Decline orders but offer an alternate or substitute item Delegate follow-up on a complaint from a customer Follow up with a reminder Grant approval for credit Introduce a new employee Notify a customer that a shipment has been delayed or that merchandise ordered is not available Notify a shipper that an order is incomplete, incorrect or damaged; also, return unwanted or incorrect merchandise Offer a sales position to someone who has not applied for employment Offer the use of a charge account Prepare a prospective customer to receive a sales telephone call Request a discount or a complimentary product or service Request a refund or reimbursement Request a rush order Request additional money or information before you can fill an order Request an increased credit line Request estimates or bids Request information on a product or service Request samples or information about products or services Thank a business for good service, low prices, or professional courtesies Thank a customer for a payment Thank a customer for purchasing a product or service Transmit a payment Transmit a shipment of merchandise that a customer has purchased Transmit an advertising copy to a magazine or other media Transmit informational or sales literature Use a referral in a sales letter Write to former stockholders or investors

A web copywriter for more than a decade, I’ve written website copy for more than 40 different industries in various roles: full time at an ad agency, as an in-house copywriter on the client side, exclusively with an SEO company, and freelance. I know my strengths and my limits. I have a clear idea of the types of web content I write best. And I know the types of companies I want to work with. If you are having a hard time finding the right freelance copywriter (or even web developer, for that matter) talk to me. If I’m not the right copywriter for you, I’ll tell you. And then I’ll do my best to help you find the right person for the job.
Thanks for the advice. I have gone though the templates and done what you suggested and joined groups relevant to the area I want to service. However I have now been blocked by Facebook for two weeks and I am not sure why. I was just joining as many groups as possible. Is there a limit to how many I can join at one time? Everywhere I turn I am hitting brick walls.
It's important to do regular reporting -- I recommend monthly -- on each of these metrics so you know where your growth levers lie. Regular reporting also helps you identify negative trends or plateaus early-on so you can address them before they become bigger issues. Most importantly, however, tracking the success of your initiatives makes it easy for you to repeat what works, eliminate what doesn't, and promote the success of your content marketing program so you can justify its expansion, and its seat at the modern marketing table.

As you complete each content writing gig, or as you gain more experience in a permanent position, add each article or piece of writing to an online portfolio. This will then help you network for other writing projects and positions in the future. With enough clips and contacts, you may then be able to freelance and work for yourself as a content writer.[14]
Once you've been regularly publishing content on your own site for a while, it might be time to start thinking about distributing your content on other sites. This could mean repurposing content into new formats and publishing them on your blog, creating original content specifically for external sites -- such as Medium -- or publishing website content on various social networks.
Each time you refresh the login page, you see a different, equally clever example email belonging to a fictional character, like Ender from Ender's Game and Dana Scully from The X-Files -- a great example of nostalgia marketing. This is a small detail, but nonetheless a reminder that there are real humans behind the website and product's design. Delightful microcopy like this kinda feels like I just shared a private joke with someone at the company.
Since reading your stuff I can’t help but do #1 (exericise #1 that is…..) when I see ads. Our local newspaper just started a campaign on the newsstands that I just don’t understand. It’s their logo, a photo of a loaf of bread, and the copy “The best thing since sliced bread.” WHAT? How on earth does this warm me up to buy a newspaper? And the cliche!

It's important to do regular reporting -- I recommend monthly -- on each of these metrics so you know where your growth levers lie. Regular reporting also helps you identify negative trends or plateaus early-on so you can address them before they become bigger issues. Most importantly, however, tracking the success of your initiatives makes it easy for you to repeat what works, eliminate what doesn't, and promote the success of your content marketing program so you can justify its expansion, and its seat at the modern marketing table.


I’ve just set up my own website, now, and those early gigs have provided some great testimonials, which is a huge boost to confidence. I used Blogger for my own website – it’s free, apart from a fiver a year for a custom domain, and it’s surprising how versatile Blogger can be, with a little practice. I’m now ready to start doing all the things Neville recommends in the above article, and the future looks loaded with potential.

Add value. That’s the secret. It’s not really a secret at all. We've already talked about it throughout this piece. Although when you look at some of the marketing companies engage in you wonder if they’re purposely avoiding the obvious. We skip advertising when it provides little to no value. If you want to learn about advertising that doesn’t get skipped, find a skateboarder and ask him if you can watch him look through a skateboard magazine. You’ll see that he spends as much time looking at the ads as he does looking at the articles and photos. Or check out The Berrics website. Much of the content is advertisements, but skaters don’t skip these videos, they watch them just like they watch the other videos, because they’re getting the value they want--good skating. As a skater I’d like to say skateboard companies pioneered content marketing decades ago, but I know they were only doing what came naturally, and selling more product was secondary to the fun of creating videos and magazines. If you want to hire someone onto your marketing team who understands content marketing intuitively, hiring a skateboarder might not be a bad step.
Building this page I try to keep in mind Seth Godin’s saying in The Purple Cow : “Marketing is not done to the product, Marketing is the product”. I believe this apply also to copywriting as you’re not only trying to sell something, the copy itself is providing (or should, from what I learn from you) some valuable information. Somehow, the copy is a product itself.
Copywriting is persuasive writing, also known as sales in print, or what I like to call closing in print. Every single day, copywriters prove that written words can influence people to take a particular action, such as buying a product or service after reading the copy. The written content – the ‘copy’ – is persuasive and meant to compel the reader to take action.
I am a huge fan of your writing, I love writing, though have not written much stuff yet but sure will do one fine day :-), I had sent you one e-mail regarding my query, I hope to get the reply soon, but as I can see that your page is already stuffed with so many queries and suggestions. So I wont take much of your time and will try to keep it precise, I wanna know one simple answer that is how to get the job offers for copy-writing? Do I have to create some resume and upload in sites, or directly go to the sites look for the job and apply, or do I have to do my publicity first? How can I get the job ultimately?
Step 2: Understand their buyer’s journey. A buying journey maps a buyer’s decision-making process during a purchase and will help you determine what content you need. Different kinds of content appeal to different buyers in different stages of their journey. By mapping your buying stages, you’ll better understand the process buyers go through when considering your product or service. As a result, you’ll be able to develop a content strategy that speaks directly to buyers,  no matter what stage they’re in.
Traditional marketers have long used content to disseminate information about a brand and build a brand's reputation. Taking advantage of technological advances in transportation and communication, business owners started to apply content marketing techniques in the late 19th century. They also attempted to build connections with their customers. For example:
Everywhere, there are people / small businesses trying to create their own website who get stuck and need help. As a copywriter, you are the ideal person to help them, because you don’t just give them “a website”. With copywriting skills you can give them something which delivers their message powerfully. (The technical side of creating a website can be easily learned – just sign up for free accounts with Blogger, Wix, Weebly…and play around with them to get familiar.)
Great post !! I only recently found your Kopywriting Kourse, purchased and was able to implement a great number of improvements that evening. Thank you! I also used the website “editor” to rewrite ad’s and stories to compare to the original…what a great tool! (and a great way to “wind up my smart ass friends” when I send a screen copy of f’d up stories on them…) I told them i found a way to “hack” their web based articles….I guess I should tell them today I was just messin’ with them……or maybe let it ride over the weekend….
Your marketing plan should go beyond the types of content you'll create -- it should also cover you'll organize your content. With the help of an editorial calendar, you'll be on the right track for publishing a well-balanced and diverse content library on your website. Then, create a social media content calendar so you can promote and manage your content on other sites.
You write a blog post about your infographic generator, and included a link to the tool in the post so people can try it for themselves. Let's say the visitor-to-lead conversion rate is the same on this blog post as it was in your PPC campaign -- 2%. That means if 100 people read that blog post in your first month, you'd get two leads from it. But your work is done now. And over time, that one blog post you wrote years ago will continue to generate leads over, and over, and over, every single month. And not just that blog post -- every blog post you write will do the same.
I’m currently taking a course on how to write case studies. Being a fiction writer, one of the aspects I love is the research and being able to talk to SMEs. I figured writing case studies would be a good fit. I was thinking about focusing on case studies for professional services. Which leaves it open to a pretty broad spectrum. As a newbie in this field, is it TOO broad? Should I narrow it down and focus on a specific TYPE or professional service?
Traditionally, marketers have had to “rent attention” from other people’s media through display ads on websites, booths at trade shows, or emails sent to third-party lists. For example, when a brand pays out millions of dollars for a Super Bowl ad, they are renting the attention that the TV networks have built. Content marketing, on the other hand, allows marketers to become publishers by building their own audiences and attracting their own attention. By creating and distributing content that buyers find useful, marketers increase their brand awareness and preference by establishing a relationship of trust with consumers as they move through the sales funnel. Additionally, content marketing is considered a less costly strategy than some others. It can have a bit of a slower start while your content library grows and reaches a larger audience.
You may also want to consider doing an internship at a publication you hope to work for full time in the future to make connections with editors and other writers at the publication. Many of these internships will likely not be paid, at least not at first. Be prepared to receive compensation in the form of connections and contacts. But be wary of being taken advantage of as free labor. If you feel uncomfortable working for free, try to find internships that pay.[9]

When businesses pursue content marketing, the main focus should be the needs of the prospect or customer. Once a business has identified the customer's need, information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, email newsletters, case studies, podcasts, how-to guides, question and answer articles, photos, blogs, etc.[5] Most of these formats belong to the digital channel.
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